ACL Injury Prevention

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) sits deep in the knee joint running from the back, outer of the femur(thigh bone) to the front inner of the tibia(shin bone). It acts to control excessive forward movement of the tibia on the femur, and control rotation movements. The hamstring muscles also help to control forward shear of the tibia, particularly when the knee is flexed > 20 degrees. Rupturing the ACL occurs in sports involving cutting and weaving such as football, basketball, touch football. One study indicated that the frequency rate for injury in soccer players is approx. 1 in 60. It

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Compression Syndrome of the ITB

Anatomy: The iliotibial band (ITB) or iliotibial tract is a band of connective tissue that runs from the top of the pelvic bone down the side of the hip and thigh and to the side of the knee. The muscles of the hip, buttock and thigh have fibres attaching into the ITB and tightness in these muscles can cause tightness in the ITB. Injury: It is thought that too much force or tension through the ITB can compress muscle fibres or tendons that lie deep underneath it. This compression causes painless breakdown of the muscle or tendon tissue. If this

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Flexibility for Swimming: Are you stretching enough?

A RHP Physiotherapy Swimming Screening checks flexibility in all of the key areas for a fluid stroke and compares them to known desirable ranges. The screening can highlight which areas could be affecting technique or causing your injury problems. Screenings can be done on an individual basis in the clinic or for groups at your club pool. FOCUS ON STREAMLINE Want to Improve Your Streamline Position?   The better your streamline position, the faster you will travel through the water. To test your streamline ability, perform those 2 simple tests. 1. Standing streamline stand side-on to a mirror and put

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Core Control Swimming: What is your core doing?

It allows more of the power produced by your kick to push you forward through the water. Good body position in the water leading to a better “streamline” position and a more efficient stroke due to less drag. A more stable attachment point for the powerful shoulder muscles to work from. This means that they can work more effectively and move your stable trunk through the water more easily. Helps reduce over activity of some muscles. This means less general muscle tightness. Less chance of injury. Adding a couple of simple drills to your workout sessions can be enough to

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Looking after your Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

vertebrae.jpgnucleus.jpg Injury to a disc can be quite painful and limit your ability to do everyday activities. Discs are most vulnerable when your spine is flexed and rotated, that is, when you bend forward and twist. When you sit your spine will also be in a flexed position so it is important to remember that sitting is like bending. These positions increase the pressure that your disc has to manage, which can lead to tears in the outer fibres of the disc and possible herniation. lumbar-disc.jpgintradiscal-pressure.jpg There are many ways to prevent injuring your back. Obviously keeping a good posture

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Pre-season Injury Prevention Report

• Decreased exercise levels during the off-season lead to: • A deterioration in the load tolerance of our tendons • Reductions in muscle strength, endurance, and power. • Reduced balance and co-ordination via a dampening down of the brain to muscle nerve pathways. • Reduced aerobic fitness • Loss of flexibility Points to Consider with pre-season training: • Begin early so there can be a gradual build up to full match fitness for the first game. Research shows that it can take several weeks for the collagen cells within your tendons to adapt to the increasing demands. Time will vary

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The Link Between Cortisol, DHEA and Insulin

As a consequence, excessive carbohydrate intake often leads to excessive cortisol secretion.  There are several causes of adrenal overload or fatigue, but if the gland has to continually produce excess cortisol due to carbohydrate overload, this will contribute. Because DHEA and cortisol act to balance each other, and because there is a finite amount of DHEA available over a lifetime, reduced DHEA levels are a sign that too much has been used and, an early sign of adrenal exhaustion. Because insulin also promotes fat storage, if there are large amounts of carbohydrates to be broken down, there will be high

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Rotator Cuff Injuries of the Shoulder

Function: The rotator cuff muscles originate from the various surfaces on the shoulder blade (scapula) and attach to the top of the arm bone, wrapping around what is called the head of humerus. Co-ordinated contraction of the rotator cuff muscles keeps the head of the humerus centred in the socket during arm movement. Without this action the shoulder becomes weak, the forces of arm movement are not well controlled, and injury and degeneration are likely. A secondary role of the rotator cuff is to assist movement of the arm into internal and external rotation (Wilk and Arrigo, 1993). Injury: An

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